Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Main|Search|PHGKB
Search PHGKB:

Last Posted: Sep 30, 2022
spot light Highlights

Identification of shared and differentiating genetic architecture for autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and case subgroups.
Mattheisen Manuel et al. Nature genetics 2022 9

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions, with considerable overlap in their genetic etiology. We dissected their shared and distinct genetic etiology by cross-disorder analyses of large datasets. We identified seven loci shared by the disorders and five loci differentiating them. All five differentiating loci showed opposite allelic directions in the two disorders and significant associations with other traits.

Differences in the genetic architecture of common and rare variants in childhood, persistent and late-diagnosed attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Rajagopal Veera M et al. Nature genetics 2022 8

We evaluated genetic differences among childhood (n?=?14,878), persistent (n?=?1,473) and late-diagnosed (n?=?6,961) ADHD cases alongside 38,303 controls, and rare variant differences in 7,650 ADHD cases and 8,649 controls. We identified four genome-wide significant loci for childhood ADHD and one for late-diagnosed ADHD. We found increased polygenic scores for ADHD in persistent ADHD compared with the other two groups. Childhood ADHD had higher genetic overlap with hyperactivity and autism compared with late-diagnosed ADHD.

Mendelian randomization analysis for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: studying a broad range of exposures and outcomes.
Soler Artigas María et al. International journal of epidemiology 2022 6

We used genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics for ADHD (n?=?53?293) and 124 traits related to anthropometry, cognitive function and intelligence, early life exposures, education and employment, lifestyle and environment, longevity, neurological, and psychiatric and mental health or personality and psychosocial factors available in the MR-Base database (16?067 =n?=766?345). Our findings strengthen previous evidence of a causal effect of ADHD liability on smoking and major depression, and are consistent with a causal effect on odds of decreased average total household income [odds ratio (OR)?=?0.966, 95% credible interval (CrI)?=?(0.954, 0.979)] and increased lifetime number of sexual partners [OR?=?1.023, 95% CrI?=?(1.013, 1.033)].

Why Family Health History is Important if You or Your Child has Learning or Attention Problems
CDC, June 13, 2022

Difficulties with learning and attention can run in families. Knowing about this family health history can help your child’s health care provider make a diagnosis if your child is having difficulty with learning or attention. Having a family member, especially another child, with a learning or attention problem can help you identify concerns early in your child. Finding learning and attention disorders early can help your child get services sooner, which can help your child succeed. Finding out more about family health history can help some parents discover for the first time that they also have a learning disorder or ADHD that has not been diagnosed or treated. However, having family members with learning or attention disorders does not automatically mean that your child will have a problem with learning or attention.


Disclaimer: Articles listed in the Public Health Genomics and Precision Health Knowledge Base are selected by the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics to provide current awareness of the literature and news. Inclusion in the update does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it imply endorsement of the article's methods or findings. CDC and DHHS assume no responsibility for the factual accuracy of the items presented. The selection, omission, or content of items does not imply any endorsement or other position taken by CDC or DHHS. Opinion, findings and conclusions expressed by the original authors of items included in the update, or persons quoted therein, are strictly their own and are in no way meant to represent the opinion or views of CDC or DHHS. References to publications, news sources, and non-CDC Websites are provided solely for informational purposes and do not imply endorsement by CDC or DHHS.

TOP