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Last Posted: Aug 18, 2022
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The oral microbiome and lung cancer risk: An analysis of 3 prospective cohort studies
E Vogtman et al, JNCI, August 5, 2022

Previous studies suggested associations between the oral microbiome and lung cancer, but studies were predominantly cross-sectional and underpowered. Multiple oral microbial measures were prospectively associated with lung cancer risk in three US cohort studies with associations varying by smoking history and histologic subtype. The oral microbiome may offer new opportunities for lung cancer prevention.

Cross-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis of 61,047 cases and 947,237 controls identifies new susceptibility loci contributing to lung cancer
J Byun et al, Nature Genetics, August 1, 2022

To identify new susceptibility loci to lung cancer among diverse populations, we performed cross-ancestry genome-wide association studies in European, East Asian and African populations and discovered five loci that have not been previously reported. We replicated 26 signals and identified 10 new lead associations from previously reported loci. Rare-variant associations tended to be specific to populations, but even common-variant associations influencing smoking behavior, such as those with CHRNA5 and CYP2A6, showed population specificity.

Poziotinib for EGFR exon 20-mutant NSCLC: Clinical efficacy, resistance mechanisms, and impact of insertion location on drug sensitivity
YY Elamin et al, Cell, July 11, 2022

We report a phase II study of 50 advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with point mutations or insertions in EGFR exon 20 treated with poziotinib (NCT03066206). The study achieved its primary endpoint, with confirmed objective response rates (ORRs) of 32% and 31% by investigator and blinded independent review, respectively, with a median progression-free survival of 5.5 months.

When can we be confident of surgical cure with ctDNA?
Frankell Alexander et al. Nature reviews. Clinical oncology 2022 7

Tracking circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) after surgery holds promise for patient management and therapeutic intervention in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent study tracks ctDNA from 261 patients with stages I–III NSCLC and suggests that the likelihood of disease relapse decreases for high-risk stage II/III patients after 18 months without ctDNA detection.


Disclaimer: Articles listed in the Public Health Genomics and Precision Health Knowledge Base are selected by the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics to provide current awareness of the literature and news. Inclusion in the update does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it imply endorsement of the article's methods or findings. CDC and DHHS assume no responsibility for the factual accuracy of the items presented. The selection, omission, or content of items does not imply any endorsement or other position taken by CDC or DHHS. Opinion, findings and conclusions expressed by the original authors of items included in the update, or persons quoted therein, are strictly their own and are in no way meant to represent the opinion or views of CDC or DHHS. References to publications, news sources, and non-CDC Websites are provided solely for informational purposes and do not imply endorsement by CDC or DHHS.

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