Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Hot Topics of the Day|PHGKB
Search PHGKB:

Archive

Hot Topics of the Day are picked by experts to capture the latest information and publications on public health genomics and precision health for various diseases and health topics. Sources include published scientific literature, reviews, blogs and popular press articles.

Sign up MyPHGKB to receive the daily hot topic email alert.

Search Archive:
Archived Hot Topics of the Day By Date
62 hot topic(s) found with the query "Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy "

Genetic screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in large, asymptomatic military cohorts.
Brough Joe et al. American journal of medical genetics. Part C, Seminars in medical genetics 2020 Feb (Posted: Feb-12-2020 10AM)


Machine learning detection of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using a wearable biosensor
R Ueno et al, NPJ Digital Medicine, December 2019 (Posted: Dec-11-2019 7AM)

Green et al. (June 24 issue)1 developed a machine learning classifier of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients using a noninvasive optical sensor incorporated in commercial smart watches. The study included 83 patients (19 patients with HCM and 64 healthy controls).


Association of Race With Disease Expression and Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
LA Eberly et al, JAMA Cardiology, December 4, 2019 (Posted: Dec-05-2019 7AM)

Compared with white patients, black patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were diagnosed at a younger age, were less likely to have sarcomere mutations, and had worse symptoms. Inequities in health care access and delivery were associated with race, with lower rates of genetic testing and invasive septal reduction therapy.


Beyond the One Gene-One Disease Paradigm: Complex Genetics and Pleiotropy in Inheritable Cardiac Disorders
Cerrone Marina et al. Circulation 2019 08 (7) 595-610 (Posted: Aug-17-2019 9AM)

Inheritable cardiac disorders are often associated with increased risk of sudden death in the young. In recent years, through genotype-phenotype studies and methodological advances in genetics, it has become evident that most inheritable cardiac disorders are not monogenic but, rather, have a complex genetic basis.


Risk Prediction Model in Children With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Work in Progress.
Bonow Robert O et al. JAMA cardiology 2019 Aug (Posted: Aug-15-2019 8AM)


Development of a Novel Risk Prediction Model for Sudden Cardiac Death in Childhood Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM Risk-Kids).
Norrish Gabrielle et al. JAMA cardiology 2019 Aug (Posted: Aug-15-2019 8AM)

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most common mode of death in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but there is no validated algorithm to identify those at highest risk. The study provides a new, validated risk stratification model for SCD in childhood HCM that can provide individualized estimates of risk at 5 years using available clinical risk factors.


Making The Case For Cascade Screening Amongst Families With Inherited Heart Diseases.
Ingles Jodie et al. Heart rhythm 2019 Jul (Posted: Jul-17-2019 8AM)


Prevalence and clinical significance of red flags in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Limongelli Giuseppe et al. International journal of cardiology 2019 Jul (Posted: Jul-17-2019 8AM)


Genetic Testing and Cascade Screening in Pediatric Long QT Syndrome and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Knight Linda M et al. Heart rhythm 2019 Jun (Posted: Jun-26-2019 8AM)

The efficacy of cascade screening for the inherited heart conditions long QT syndrome (LQTS) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is incompletely characterized. This study examined the use of genetic testing and yield of cascade screening across diverse regions in the US, and evaluated obstacles to screening in multipayor systems.


Machine learning detection of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using a wearable biosensor
EM Green et al, NPJ Digital Medicine, June 24, 2019 (Posted: Jun-24-2019 10AM)


Family screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Is it time to change practical guidelines?
Lafreniere-Roula Myriam et al. European heart journal 2019 Jun (Posted: Jun-12-2019 7AM)


A validation study of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Norrish Gabrielle et al. Europace : European pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac electrophysiology : journal of the working groups on cardiac pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac cellular electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiology 2019 Jun (Posted: Jun-05-2019 10AM)


Genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in children.
Rupp Stefan et al. Clinical research in cardiology : official journal of the German Cardiac Society 2019 Mar 108(3) 282-289 (Posted: Jun-05-2019 10AM)


Sudden Cardiac Death Risk in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Wither Our Cognitive Miser.
Ommen Steve R et al. JAMA cardiology 2019 May (Posted: May-27-2019 5PM)


Enhanced American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Strategy for Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in High-Risk Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Maron Martin S et al. JAMA cardiology 2019 May (Posted: May-27-2019 5PM)


Evaluating the Clinical Validity of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Genes.
Ingles Jodie et al. Circulation. Genomic and precision medicine 2019 Jan (Posted: Jan-30-2019 9AM)


Quantitative approaches to variant classification increase the yield and precision of genetic testing in Mendelian diseases: the case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
R Walsh et al, Genome Medicine, January 29, 2019 (Posted: Jan-30-2019 9AM)


Analysis of 51 proposed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy genes from genome sequencing data in sarcomere negative cases has negligible diagnostic yield.
Thomson Kate L et al. Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 2018 Dec (Posted: Dec-12-2018 9AM)


Genetic Testing and Counseling for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Cirino Allison L et al. Cardiology clinics 2019 Feb 37(1) 35-43 (Posted: Nov-19-2018 9AM)


Modeling Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Dish
NIH Director's Blog, November 8, 2018 Brand (Posted: Nov-08-2018 11AM)


Clinical predictors of informative genetic testing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Naraen Akriti et al. European journal of preventive cardiology 2018 Oct 2047487318808044 (Posted: Oct-24-2018 9AM)


Effect of Gender and Genetic Mutations on Outcomes in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
van Velzen Hannah G et al. The American journal of cardiology 2018 Sep (Posted: Oct-10-2018 7AM)


Exercise Training for Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: JACC Review Topic of the Week.
Dias Katrin A et al. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 2018 Sep 72(10) 1157-1165 (Posted: Sep-05-2018 9AM)


Disclosure of diagnosis to at-risk relatives by individuals diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).
Hudson Janella et al. Journal of community genetics 2018 Aug (Posted: Aug-22-2018 11AM)


Clinical Course and Management of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Maron Barry J et al. The New England journal of medicine 2018 Aug (7) 655-668 (Posted: Aug-16-2018 8AM)


Physical activity restriction for children and adolescents diagnosed with an inherited arrhythmia or cardiomyopathy and its impact on body mass index.
Christian Susan et al. Journal of cardiovascular electrophysiology 2018 Aug (Posted: Aug-15-2018 10AM)


Whole Genome Sequencing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
American College Cardiology, July 17, 2018 (Posted: Jul-18-2018 1PM)


Whole Genome Sequencing Improves Outcomes of Genetic Testing in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
RD Bagnall et al, JACC, July 2018 (Posted: Jul-17-2018 9AM)


[Genetic tests in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Benefits, limitations, and applications in clinical practice].
Gómez Arraiz I et al. Semergen 2018 May (Posted: Jun-11-2018 11AM)


Defining the diagnostic effectiveness of genes for inclusion in panels: the experience of two decades of genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at a single center
F. Mazzaratto et al, Genetics in Medicine, June 6, 2018 (Posted: Jun-06-2018 8AM)


Outcomes of Contemporary Family Screening in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
van Velzen Hannah G et al. Circulation. Genomic and precision medicine 2018 Apr 11(4) e001896 (Posted: Apr-18-2018 10AM)


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Update.
Geske Jeffrey B et al. JACC. Heart failure 2018 Apr (Posted: Apr-18-2018 10AM)


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Update.
Geske Jeffrey B et al. JACC. Heart failure 2018 Apr (Posted: Apr-18-2018 10AM)


Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - Identification of cause and risk stratification through exome sequencing.
Biswas Amitabh et al. Gene 2018 Mar (Posted: Mar-27-2018 1PM)


Diagnostic impact of genetic testing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: The story of two families.
Lorca Rebeca et al. International journal of cardiology 2016 Feb 205161-162 (Posted: Mar-27-2018 1PM)


The Cardiomyopathy Registry of the EURObservational Research Programme of the European Society of Cardiology: baseline data and contemporary management of adult patients with cardiomyopathies.
Charron Philippe et al. European heart journal 2018 Jan (Posted: Jan-31-2018 9AM)


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Past, Present and Future.
Liew Alphonsus C et al. Journal of clinical medicine 2017 Dec 6(12) (Posted: Dec-13-2017 9AM)


Evaluation of the Mayo Clinic Phenotype-Based Genotype Predictor Score in Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Murphy Sinead L et al. Journal of cardiovascular translational research 2016 Apr 9(2) 153-61 (Posted: Nov-07-2017 0PM)


A Comparison of Whole Genome Sequencing to Multigene Panel Testing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients.
Cirino Allison L et al. Circulation. Cardiovascular genetics 2017 Oct 10(5) (Posted: Oct-18-2017 11AM)


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Gene Testing: Go Big?
Puckelwartz Megan J et al. Circulation. Cardiovascular genetics 2017 Oct 10(5) (Posted: Oct-18-2017 11AM)


Clinical and Genetic Diagnosis of Nonischemic Sudden Cardiac Death.
Jiménez-Jáimez Juan et al. Revista espanola de cardiologia (English ed.) 2017 Oct 70(10) 808-816 (Posted: Oct-04-2017 10AM)


Genetic tests in the assessment of patients and at-risk relatives: The example of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Saraiva Jorge Manuel et al. Revista portuguesa de cardiologia : orgao oficial da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia = Portuguese journal of cardiology : an official journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology 2017 36(3) 167-168 (Posted: Aug-23-2017 9AM)


Incorporating Genetic Testing Into Cardiovascular Practice.
McNally Elizabeth M et al. JAMA cardiology 2017 Aug (Posted: Aug-16-2017 8AM)


Genetic testing impacts the utility of prospective familial screening in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through identification of a nonfamilial subgroup.
Ko Carol et al. Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 2017 Jun (Posted: Jun-28-2017 10AM)


Genetic testing impacts the utility of prospective familial screening in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through identification of a nonfamilial subgroup
C Ko et al, Genetics in Medicine, June 22, 2017 (Posted: Jun-23-2017 11AM)


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Childhood: Risk Management Through Family Screening.
Munk Kim et al. The Journal of pediatrics 2017 May (Posted: May-24-2017 9AM)


Attitudes, knowledge and consequences of uncertain genetic findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
C Burns et al, Eur J Human Genetics, May 3, 2017 (Posted: May-03-2017 10AM)


Effect of Moderate-Intensity Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy A Randomized Clinical Trial
S Saberi et al, JAMA, March 17, 2017 (Posted: Mar-20-2017 4PM)


Recreational Exercise in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
AT Owens et al, JAMA, March 17, 2017 (Posted: Mar-20-2017 4PM)


Moderate exercise may be beneficial for HCM patients
Science Magazine, March 17, 2017 (Posted: Mar-17-2017 3PM)


Usefulness of Genetic Testing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Analysis Using Real-World Data.
Alejandra Restrepo-Cordoba M et al. Journal of cardiovascular translational research 2017 Jan (Posted: Feb-01-2017 11AM)


The Role of Genetic Testing in the Identification of Young Athletes with Inherited Primitive Cardiac Disorders at Risk of Exercise Sudden Death.
Tiziano Francesco Danilo et al. Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine 2016 28 (Posted: Oct-16-2016 8AM)


Cautionary Tale Of Genetic Testing: You May Drop Dead! Oops, Never Mind
C Goldberg, WBUR, AUgust 18, 2016 (Posted: Aug-21-2016 2PM)


Value of Genetic Testing for the Prediction of Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
van Velzen Hannah G et al. The American journal of cardiology 2016 Jun (Posted: Aug-03-2016 9AM)


Comprehensive Versus Targeted Genetic Testing in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Bales Nathan D et al. Pediatric cardiology 2016 Mar (Posted: Mar-09-2016 9AM)


How Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Became a Contemporary Treatable Genetic Disease With Low Mortality
BJ Marron, JAMA Cardiology, March 2016 (Posted: Mar-04-2016 10AM)


Diagnostic impact of genetic testing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: The story of two families.
Lorca Rebeca et al. International journal of cardiology 2015 Dec 205161-162 (Posted: Jan-13-2016 2PM)


Genotype-phenotype Correlations of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy When Diagnosed in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.
Loar Robert W et al. Congenit Heart Dis 2015 Jun 10. (Posted: Aug-21-2015 10AM)


Sports and Exercise in Athletes with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Alpert Craig et al. Clin Sports Med 2015 Jul (3) 489-505 (Posted: Jul-18-2015 7PM)


Cardiomyopathy
From NHLBI health topic site Brand (Posted: Jan-01-2014 0AM)

What Is Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. In rare cases, the muscle tissue in the heart is replaced with scar tissue. As cardiomyopathy worsens, the heart becomes weaker. It's less able to pump blood through the body and maintain a normal electrical rhythm. This can lead to heart failure or irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias. In turn, heart failure can cause fluid to build up in the lungs, ankles, feet, legs, or abdomen. The weakening of the heart also can cause other complications, such as heart valve problems. Overview The types of cardiomyopathy are: ?Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ?Dilated cardiomyopathy ?Restrictive cardiomyopathy ?Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia ?Unclassified cardiomyopathy Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. "Acquired" means you aren't born with the disease, but you develop it due to another disease, condition, or factor. "Inherited" means your parents passed the gene for the disease on to you. Many times, the cause of cardiomyopathy isn't known. Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages. However, people in certain age groups are more likely to have certain types of cardiomyopathy. This article focuses on cardiomyopathy in adults. Outlook Some people who have cardiomyopathy have no signs or symptoms and need no treatment. For other people, the disease develops quickly, symptoms are severe, and serious complications occur. Treatments for cardiomyopathy include lifestyle changes, medicines, surgery, implanted devices to correct arrhythmias, and a nonsurgical procedure. These treatments can control symptoms, reduce complications, and stop the disease from getting worse. Other Names Other Names for Dilated Cardiomyopathy ?Alcoholic cardiomyopathy. This term is used when overuse of alcohol causes the disease. ?Congestive cardiomyopathy. ?Diabetic cardiomyopathy. ?Familial dilated cardiomyopathy. ?Idiopathic cardiomyopathy. ?Ischemic cardiomyopathy. This term is used when coronary heart disease (also called coronary artery disease) or heart attack causes the disease. ?Peripartum cardiomyopathy. This term is used when the disease develops in a woman shortly before or after she gives birth. ?Primary cardiomyopathy. Other Names for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy ?Asymmetric septal hypertrophy ?Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ?Hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy ?Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy ?Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis Other Names for Restrictive Cardiomyopathy ?Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy ?Infiltrative cardiomyopathy Other Names for Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia ?Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy ?Right ventricular cardiomyopathy ?Right ventricular dysplasia


Angina
From NHLBI health topic site Brand (Posted: Jan-01-2014 0AM)

What Is Angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh) is chest pain or discomfort that occurs if an area of your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood. Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing in your chest. The pain also can occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. Angina pain may even feel like indigestion. Angina isn't a disease; it's a symptom of an underlying heart problem. Angina usually is a symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD is the most common type of heart disease in adults. It occurs if a waxy substance called plaque (plak) builds up on the inner walls of your coronary arteries. These arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart. Plaque Buildup in an Artery Figure A shows a normal artery with normal blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of a normal artery. Figure B shows an artery with plaque buildup. The inset image shows a cross-section of an artery with plaque buildup.Figure A shows a normal artery with normal blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of a normal artery. Figure B shows an artery with plaque buildup. The inset image shows a cross-section of an artery with plaque buildup. Plaque narrows and stiffens the coronary arteries. This reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle, causing chest pain. Plaque buildup also makes it more likely that blood clots will form in your arteries. Blood clots can partially or completely block blood flow, which can cause a heart attack. Angina also can be a symptom of coronary microvascular disease (MVD). This is heart disease that affects the heart?s smallest coronary arteries. In coronary MVD, plaque doesn't create blockages in the arteries like it does in CHD. Studies have shown that coronary MVD is more likely to affect women than men. Coronary MVD also is called cardiac syndrome X and nonobstructive CHD. Types of Angina The major types of angina are stable, unstable, variant (Prinzmetal's), and microvascular. Knowing how the types differ is important. This is because they have different symptoms and require different treatments. Stable Angina Stable angina is the most common type of angina. It occurs when the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. (?Pattern? refers to how often the angina occurs, how severe it is, and what factors trigger it.) If you have stable angina, you can learn its pattern and predict when the pain will occur. The pain usually goes away a few minutes after you rest or take your angina medicine. Stable angina isn't a heart attack, but it suggests that a heart attack is more likely to happen in the future. Unstable Angina Unstable angina doesn't follow a pattern. It may occur more often and be more severe than stable angina. Unstable angina also can occur with or without physical exertion, and rest or medicine may not relieve the pain. Unstable angina is very dangerous and requires emergency treatment. This type of angina is a sign that a heart attack may happen soon. Variant (Prinzmetal's) Angina Variant angina is rare. A spasm in a coronary artery causes this type of angina. Variant angina usually occurs while you're at rest, and the pain can be severe. It usually happens between midnight and early morning. Medicine can relieve this type of angina. Microvascular Angina Microvascular angina can be more severe and last longer than other types of angina. Medicine may not relieve this type of angina. Overview Experts believe that nearly 7 million people in the United States suffer from angina. The condition occurs equally among men and women. Angina can be a sign of CHD, even if initial tests don't point to the disease. However, not all chest pain or discomfort is a sign of CHD. Other conditions also can cause chest pain, such as: ?Pulmonary embolism (a blockage in a lung artery) ?A lung infection ?Aortic dissection (tearing of a major artery) ?Aortic stenosis (narrowing of the heart?s aortic valve) ?Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee; heart muscle disease) ?Pericarditis (inflammation in the tissues that surround the heart) ?A panic attack All chest pain should be checked by a doctor. Other Names ?Acute coronary syndrome ?Angina pectoris ?Chest pain ?Coronary artery spasms ?Microvascular angina ?Prinzmetal's angina ?Stable or common angina ?Unstable angina ?Variant angina


Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
From NCATS Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Brand (Posted: Jan-01-2011 0AM)



Disclaimer: Articles listed in Hot Topics of the Day are selected by the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics to provide current awareness of the scientific literature and news. Inclusion in the update does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it imply endorsement of the article's methods or findings. CDC and DHHS assume no responsibility for the factual accuracy of the items presented. The selection, omission, or content of items does not imply any endorsement or other position taken by CDC or DHHS. Opinion, findings and conclusions expressed by the original authors of items included in the Clips, or persons quoted therein, are strictly their own and are in no way meant to represent the opinion or views of CDC or DHHS. References to publications, news sources, and non-CDC Websites are provided solely for informational purposes and do not imply endorsement by CDC or DHHS.
TOP