Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Main|Search|PHGKB
Search PHGKB:

Last Posted: Oct 04, 2022
spot light Highlights

Precision Medicine in Diabetes, Current Research and Future Perspectives
R Franceschi, J Per Medicine, July 28, 2022

Recently the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) have jointly released an expert opinion-based consensus report on precision medicine. The report defines precision diabetes medicine as “an approach to optimize the diagnosis, prediction, prevention, or treatment of diabetes by integrating multidimensional data, accounting for individual differences”, and it is characterized by six categories; precision diagnosis, precision therapeutics, precision prevention, precision treatment, precision prognosis and precision monitoring. Precision medicine in diabetes utilizes the individual’s unique genetic makeup, environment or context data (that can be collected from clinical records, wearable technology, genomics and other ‘omics data) and allows one to appreciate individual characteristics, differences, circumstances and preferences

Polygenic Risk Scores for Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
JW O'Sullivan et al, Circulation, July 18, 2022

Individuals and their physicians are increasingly presented with polygenic risk scores for cardiovascular conditions in clinical encounters. In this scientific statement, we review the contemporary science, clinical considerations, and future challenges for polygenic risk scores for cardiovascular diseases. We selected 5 cardiometabolic diseases (coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolic disease) and response to drug therapy and offer provisional guidance to health care professionals, researchers, policymakers, and patients.

Incorporating family history of disease improves polygenic risk scores in diverse populations
MLA Hujeol et al, Cell Genomics, July 13, 2022

Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) derived from genotype data and family history (FH) of disease provide valuable information for predicting disease risk, but PRSs perform poorly when applied to diverse populations. Here, we explore methods for combining both types of information (PRS-FH) in UK Biobank data. We evaluated PRS, FH, and PRS-FH using liability-scale R2, primarily focusing on 3 well-powered diseases (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and depression). PRS attained average prediction R2s of 5.8%, 4.0%, and 0.53% in non-British Europeans, South Asians, and Africans, confirming poor cross-population transferability. In contrast, PRS-FH attained average prediction R2s of 13%, 12%, and 10%, respectively, representing a large improvement in Europeans and an extremely large improvement in Africans. In conclusion, including family history improves the accuracy of polygenic risk scores, particularly in diverse populations.

International electronic health record-derived post-acute sequelae profiles of COVID-19 patients
HG Zhang et al, NPJ Digital Medicine, June 29, 2022

We leveraged electronic health record (EHR) data from 277 international hospitals representing 414,602 patients with COVID-19, 2.3 million control patients without COVID-19 in the inpatient and outpatient settings, and over 221 million diagnosis codes to systematically identify new-onset conditions enriched among patients with COVID-19 during the post-acute period. Compared to inpatient controls, inpatient COVID-19 cases were at significant risk for angina pectoris (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.09–1.55), heart failure (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10–1.35), cognitive dysfunctions (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07–1.31), and fatigue (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07–1.30). Relative to outpatient controls, outpatient COVID-19 cases were at risk for pulmonary embolism (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.58–2.76), venous embolism (RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.17–1.54), atrial fibrillation (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.13–1.50), type 2 diabetes (RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.16–1.36) and vitamin D deficiency (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.09–1.30).


Disclaimer: Articles listed in the Public Health Genomics and Precision Health Knowledge Base are selected by the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics to provide current awareness of the literature and news. Inclusion in the update does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it imply endorsement of the article's methods or findings. CDC and DHHS assume no responsibility for the factual accuracy of the items presented. The selection, omission, or content of items does not imply any endorsement or other position taken by CDC or DHHS. Opinion, findings and conclusions expressed by the original authors of items included in the update, or persons quoted therein, are strictly their own and are in no way meant to represent the opinion or views of CDC or DHHS. References to publications, news sources, and non-CDC Websites are provided solely for informational purposes and do not imply endorsement by CDC or DHHS.

TOP