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Last Posted: May 21, 2024
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The State of State Biomarker Testing Insurance Coverage Laws

From the article:" There has been a recent push for legislation mandating coverage of “biomarker testing” according to evidence that receipt of such testing can depend on race and ethnicity, age, geography, or site of care. A specific type of biomarker testing for cancer subtypes (ie, “tumor profiling”) is becoming particularly important because many newer cancer therapies target specific mutations (eg, EGFR in non–small cell lung cancer, KRAS in colorectal cancer). Although use of biomarker testing is increasing, barriers to access persist. Cost and lack of insurance coverage are common barriers to testing because insurance coverage varies across commercial payers, Medicare, and Medicaid."

Integration of pathologic characteristics, genetic risk and lifestyle exposure for colorectal cancer survival assessment
J Xin et al, Nature Comm, April 8, 2024

From the abstract: "The development of an effective survival prediction tool is key for reducing colorectal cancer mortality. Here, we apply a three-stage study to devise a polygenic prognostic score (PPS) for stratifying colorectal cancer overall survival. Leveraging two cohorts of 3703 patients, we first perform a genome-wide survival association analysis to develop eight candidate PPSs. Further using an independent cohort with 470 patients, we identify the 287 variants-derived PPS (i.e., PPS287) achieving an optimal prediction performance [hazard ratio (HR) per SD?=?1.99, P?=?1.76?×?10-8], accompanied by additional tests in two external cohorts, with HRs per SD of 1.90 (P?=?3.21?×?10-14; 543 patients) and 1.80 (P?=?1.11?×?10-9; 713 patients). Notably, the detrimental impact of pathologic characteristics and genetic risk could be attenuated by a healthy lifestyle, yielding a 7.62% improvement in the 5-year overall survival rate. "

What to Know About Lynch Syndrome
ThedaCare Genetic Counseling, March 2024

From the article: " While it is impossible to change our genes, with knowledge comes power. In the case of Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that can increase a person’s risk for developing colorectal and other types of cancer, that’s especially true. Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month offers a reminder for everyone to examine their risk for colorectal cancer and to explore options for screening, as well as genetic testing, when recommended."

Lynch Syndrome Ups Risk for Colorectal, Other Cancers
E Herlache, Cancer Care, March 2024

From the article: "It’s impossible to change our genes, but with knowledge comes power. In the case of Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that ups people’s risks for developing colorectal and other types of cancer, that’s especially true. Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month offers a reminder for everyone to examine their risk for colorectal cancer and to explore options for screening as well as genetic testing, when warranted. Lynch syndrome puts a person at a higher risk of developing colorectal, uterine, and ovarian cancer. It’s also associated with other cancers, including kidney, stomach, bladder, brain, prostate, and pancreatic cancer. "


Disclaimer: Articles listed in the Public Health Genomics and Precision Health Knowledge Base are selected by the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics to provide current awareness of the literature and news. Inclusion in the update does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it imply endorsement of the article's methods or findings. CDC and DHHS assume no responsibility for the factual accuracy of the items presented. The selection, omission, or content of items does not imply any endorsement or other position taken by CDC or DHHS. Opinion, findings and conclusions expressed by the original authors of items included in the update, or persons quoted therein, are strictly their own and are in no way meant to represent the opinion or views of CDC or DHHS. References to publications, news sources, and non-CDC Websites are provided solely for informational purposes and do not imply endorsement by CDC or DHHS.

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